certifired_img

Books and Documents

Books and Documents

A story that covers six Muslim families in a Tamil Nadu village

This is a story that covers six Muslim families in a village in Tamil Nadu and moves along chapter by untitled chapter, revolving around the lives of Rabia and a few other Muslim girls over a period of one year. The novel has drawn deeply from Salma's own childhood in a village near Tiruchi. Here the plot is subordinated to capturing the postures of the community she is writing about. This of course is the pre-Babri Masjid demolition period and so you do not find signs of a revivalist Islamic community. In any case, Salma does not touch the issues concerning Muslims in Tamil Nadu. Among her cast of characters there are non-Muslims such as Mariyayi, dalit mistress of Karim, through whom the author highlights the Tamil Muslim attitude to caste and women. -- S. THEODORE BASKARAN

 

Chapter 8: Islam A Challenge to Religion

The Law of Requital works unerringly. There is a necessary connection between acts and their effects. Good actions are necessarily rewarded and wrong actions are invariably punished. In social life, however, the connection between a socially approved act and its reward is external and contingent. Let us illustrate this point. A man undertakes to perform a job on the understanding that he will be paid an agreed sum of money on its completion. He may do the work but may not get the reward. His employer may die, become insolvent or prove faithless. On the other hand, the connection between moral actions and their effects is internal and necessary. The effect is on the personality of the doer. If the effect is good, the doer is carried forward towards his goal of self-realisation; if it is bad he is necessarily thrown back. Every moral act works consequential changes in the human personality. These changes may be in the direction of greater integration or of disruption. They may or may not be conducive to "spiritual" health. The requirements of "spiritual" health are different from those of physical health. Suppose a man somehow finds himself in possession of a sum of money and spends it to buy butter and eggs. His health will improve on this nourishing diet. Whether he had honestly earned the money or had stolen it, makes no difference to the effect on his health. But his "spiritual" health is a different matter. It will suffer if the money had been stolen, even if he has put it to a good use. We have, therefore, to distinguish between the physical effects of our actions and their moral effects. The Law of Requital, in the moral sphere, refers exclusively to the moral effects, to the enhancement or deterioration of the human personality. ---  Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

 

Chapter 6: Islam A Challenge to Religion

We say that the Moral Law has a real existence, that there is such a thing as absolute Morality, that there is something absolutely true or false in ethical judgements, whether we or any number of human beings at any given time actually think so or not. Such a belief is distinctly implied to what we mean by Morality. The idea of such an unconditional objectively valid Moral Law, or ideal undoubtedly exists as a psychological fact. The question before us is whether it is capable of theoretical justification. We must then face the question where such an ideal exists, and what manner of existence, we are to attribute to it. Certainly, it is to be found, wholly and completely, in no individual human consciousness. Men actually think differently about moral questions and there is no empirical reason for supposing that they will ever do otherwise. Where then and how does the moral ideal really exist? -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

 

Chapter 7: Islam A Challenge to Religion

At every moment in his life, man faces a number of possibilities, every one of which is "taqdir," in the terminology of the Quran. His freedom is limited only to the number of possibilities open to him. He is free to choose any one of them but he cannot go out of their range. He cannot, himself, enlarge the range of possibilities. He enjoys freedom within the prescribed range but not outside it. On this view, the apparent contradiction between the freedom with which man is credited and the destiny to which he is supposed to be subject disappears. Destiny must not be understood in the sense that each and every act of man is predetermined and preordained. The Quran does not lend support to the belief that what man becomes—a saint or a villain—does not depend on his free choice but on the decrees of an impersonal inexorable Fate. In the Quran’s scale, destiny is not synonymous with necessity (or fatality, as they generally call it); it only denotes the range and reach of his capacities. It indicates in what directions he can go. How far he can go is determined by his destiny; how far he will go depends on himself alone. God does not dictate to man what objective he should have; He just gives him the helping hand in his efforts to attain the goal he has set for himself. Iqbal has expressed this relationship in a poem of exquisite beauty. -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

 

Chapter 5: Islam A Challenge to Religion

The Qur'an appeals to reason. Its professed aim is to make men rational and clear sighted, not to make them superstitious. The Qur'an directs man's attention to the phenomena of nature and the facts of history, as they reveal the power of God and His wisdom. Man is invited to look at and reflect upon the grandeur of the heavens, the beauty of the earth, the freshness of dawn, the glory of sunset and the terrifying force of the wind as it sweeps over the open spaces of the desert. Pointedly, it asks: "Are not these marvellous? What more do you want? "The phenomena of nature, at once beautiful and mysterious, can fully gratify man's sense of wonder. However, the people with whom the Nabi of Islam had to deal were steeped in superstition. They were obsessed with the craving for the miraculous. They not only believed that the laws of nature could be violated but regarded such a violation as the only proof that could be offered for the truth of a statement. Instead of scrutinizing the rational grounds of the statement and accepting it if adequate evidence was adduced in its favour, they asked whether the man who made it could work wonders or not. It was not easy to deal with and win over people whose attitude to truth was so irrational. -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

Chapter 4: Islam A Challenge to Religion

According to the view set forth in the Qur'an, man is born neither good nor bad, but with the power and freedom to become either. He is endowed with immerse potentialities. If he develops them and employs them for the moral and material advancement of mankind, his conduct is good; if he fails to utilize his immense resources or puts them to uses which are harmful to mankind, his conduct is bad. Wahi or Divine Guidance points out the way to self-realization and to the promotion of knowledge and happiness. By following the path which is pointed out by Wahi, man can finally achieve the status of a "mo’min". A "mo’min" is at peace with himself and with the world because he has successfully resolved his inner and outer conflicts. Wahi shows the way to harmony in the individual mind as well as in human society. The verses cited above to the effect that man is bad, simply mean that if he ignores Divine Guidance and follows his baser desires he is liable to become worse, and worse. -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

 

“What have we done to democracy?” asks Roy. “What have we turned it into? What happens once democracy has been used up? When it has been hollowed out and emptied of meaning? What happens when each of its institutions has metastasised into something dangerous? Could it be that democracy, the sacred answer to our short- term hopes and prayers, the protector of our individual freedoms and nurturer of our avaricious dreams, will turn out to be the endgame for the human race?” Roy, of course, doesn’t talk of a return to authoritarianism. She X- rays the symbiotic relationship between democratic governance, the growth of fascism and the free market, and exposes how they all feed off one another.

The ascent of the “fascist BJP” began around the same time as economic liberalisation, the book points out. Today, the Sangh Parivar’s biggest project is “Hinduising” Dalits and Adivasis, and pitting them against each other and against the minorities and Maoists. This has been visible in the way Dalits and Adivasis were unleashed on Muslims in Gujarat, the killings of Christians in Orissa, and in the creation of the anti- Maoist Salwa Judum in Chhattisgarh, Roy argues. -- Saif Shahin

 

For Islam the locus of value is the individual self and not society. Self-development of individual man is of supreme importance. Everything else must be subordinated to this end. The Qur'an aims at the production of free and good men, and such men spontaneously and of their own accord, will share their possessions with their fellow beings. A society composed of such men will be free from the evils of luxury in one class and poverty in the other. A powerful incentive to generosity and selfless service of others is provided by the belief in the Hereafter. The man who believes in the Hereafter will naturally attach far greater importance to the values that he can carry over to a higher plane than to the material goods which he will have to leave behind when he dies. Goth has expressed the idea beautifully thus: That man is dead even in this life who has no belief in another.18 The process of the development of human personality, the Qur'anic economic order and the life hereafter will all be discussed further in subsequent chapters. -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

 

Obviously, Islam fulfils all the requirements of Deen. Islam, as Iqbal puts it, "is neither dogma, nor priesthood, nor ritual."8 It is much more than any of these or all of these. It is the vivid sense of God's directive force and unflinching working of His laws. It is absolute iman in God's wisdom and His purpose. It is hearty participation in the upward progressive trend and movement of life and the world viewed as the expression of God's creative force. Islam stands for life-fulfilment and rejects life-denial as unworthy of man. It commands us to face facts and not to shrink from them and take refuge in fantasy, and requires us to control and harness natural forces for achieving our ends. Asceticism, quietism and monasticism are all repugnant to Islam. Islam lays stress oil social life and on its value for man, and does not regard the body as an evil and as an impediment to "spiritual" progress. It wants man to respect the rights of the body as well as the rights of the self. For this reason, Islam does not approve of self-abnegation and self-mortification. There is nothing mysterious in it and it has no place for mysticism. It aims at the establishment of a social order based on permanent values in which all its members act as free agents striving for a higher and noble cause of making man’s abode on this earth more beautiful, and making him fit for further evolutionary stages of life.

    Islam, as a living force, will continue to play a vital role in the moral uplift and social, cultural and political unification of mankind. It will continue to make valuable contributions to the knowledge and culture of mankind. Above all, it will continue to enrich the "spiritual" 9 life of man and thus strengthen and elevate his self or his personality. -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

Religion can be traced back to the dawn of human civilization. The caverns of primitive men, wherein dead bodies were laid with a provision of food and weapons, suggest beliefs and practices which are unmistakably religious in character. It would seem that no sooner had man attained the stage of mental development, represented by self-consciousness, and started on the road to civilization, than his breathless wonder at the world around him gave way to speculation on his origin and destiny and on the power which created the world and sustains it. His thinking took the form of myth-making and his tools of thought were not concepts but symbols. He felt vaguely but intensely an infinite power at work in the world around him. This dimly-sensed power evoked in him the responses of fear and reverence, or worship. The urge to worship appears to have always been there, but man can worship only that which he believes to be both good and powerful, because of his own helplessness. Primitive man was slowly and painfully groping his way to the idea of religion. He was seeking, with his scanty resources, for an object which he could appease or revere and worship. No doubt, he worshipped crude objects or simple natural phenomena, but we must not forget that for him they only symbolized the supreme power at work in the universe. -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

The first few chapters of this work comprise a historical discussion of the concepts of God and religion. It should not be taken for a, discussion of deen; nor is it an attempt to compare Islam with other religions and establish its superiority over them. From the observations made earlier in this Introduction, it should be clear that a comparison between Islam and the existing religions is out of question. Islam is a deen, or a way of life, which can be compared only with another way of life, and not with any religion, for religion as such, has nothing at all to do with the problems of human life on earth. This explains why the Qur’an does not present Islam as a rival to any religions. On the other hand, it asserts that this deen (system of life) shall ultimately prevail over all the man-made systems (9: 33). I would, therefore, entreat you, kind reader, not to treat this work as a book of religion; it should be studied only from one point of view and that is: whether or not the way of life that it expounds offers a solution to the grave difficulties and problems with which mankind is faced at present.

Today, all thoughtful men are disgusted both with materialism as well as religion (madhhab), for neither of these offers a way out of humanity's present predicaments. The only solution is through the deen that is expounded in the following pages. -- Allama Ghulam Ahmad Parwez

Malik claims this was a calculated move by Khomeini – then facing the ignominy of withdrawal from the war in Iraq – to subvert reformist voices within Iran and gain political ground across the Muslim world. “The fatwa sowed confusion and division among supporters of the Saudi regime,” writes Malik. “A number of militants who had taken part in the Afghan jihad against the Soviet Union and who had been within Riyadh’s orbit now pledged allegiance to Tehran… The reformers were forced to denounce Rushdie.”
The fatwa also turned Islam into a domestic issue for the West. Malik, who was born in India but grew up marching along anti-racism rallies in 1980s Britain, explains how it was these progressive rallies that made the ground fertile for the seed of the fatwa to grow into the cactus of Islamism. -- Saif Shahin

Moral progress in history can be said not to depend so much in the improvement of the moral code as in the widening of the area wherein that code is accepted, though through wider acceptance a certain standardized improvement does take place. Take for example sexual morality how has it changed over centuries. Among the North Americans the young men and women mated [34] freely. Among the Papuans of New Guinea pre-marital promiscuity was the rule, commonly practised and commonly accepted. Similar sexual liberties were pre­valent amongst the Igorols of the Philippines, the natives of upper Burma, the Kaffirs and Bushmen of Africa, the tithes of the Niger and Uganda, Tahiti and Polynesia.

Chastity is a late phenomenon. The primitive [35] tribes held virginity with contempt - it was held to be a barrier to marriage. Some scholars hold that virginity came to be prized when the agricultural landlord began to consider women also as a part of his property. I hold the view that the shift in the moral code came with the religious ideologies. Both the Pharaoh and Hammu-Rabi law made adultery punishable and the sanctity of the marriage bond received religious sanction later. The gradual wide acceptance of or indifference to, the post war wave of permissiveness is a throw back to the primitive heritage and show, not the lowering of the standard, but negatives the necessity of any standard even of the natural law, due to the weakening of the religious moral link. The view of the moral law as a law of nature was adopted by the Christian thinkers hesitatingly and reluctantly in spite of what St. Tho­mas Aquinas [36] (1225-1274) taught… Masarrat Husain Zuberi

The Criminals of Islam by Dr. Shabbir Ahmed
By Shabbir Ahmed M.D., author, social acivist
The Criminals of Islam by Dr. Shabbir Ahmed
By Shabbir Ahmed M.D.

The Criminals of Islam by Dr. Shabbir Ahmed is probably the most challenging book you will ever read. It took courage to write this book and it will take courage to read it. It will give you an extraordinary stimulus to think and reflect. According to Dr. A. N. Whitehead, “Our inherited beliefs are entrenched in our psyche and emotions like idols. The shaking or breaking of these idols is no less a calamity in whatever form they exist.” Therefore, this book is recommended only for the open-minded reader with considerable moral courage.

As studying, learning and teaching the Quran was incumbent on every Muslim, mosques were the earliest centres of formal education. Free lectures were given on the Holy Quran and Sunnah; later a Jurisprudence, Logic, Ethics, Philosophy were also included gradually. However, standard educational institutions were later set up and handsomely endowed not only providing free education but also free board and lodging. Throughout the Muslim world education was free at all levels and illiteracy was almost unknown....In distant Spain fifteen years after the death of Imam Ghazali was born Ibn Rushd who was destined to keep alight the torch lit by Al-Kindi and Farabi - and dominate thinking" in awakening Europe. Imam Ghazali's fame had spread even to the distant Spain and Ibn Rushd felt honour bound to defend Philosophy and its Masters and refute Ghazali's "Incoherence of Philosophers" with "Incoherence of the incoherent." -- Masarrat Husain Zuberi

 

Aristotle and Imam Ghazali are two immortals of history who put their seal on European and Muslim philosophical scholarship through succeeding generations. The generations disappeared in the fold of time but their teachings continue to attract mankind. Still they remain difficult and controversial as in their own times…. The general 'theme of such accusation is that in his enthusiastic defence of religion, Al-Ghazali, unintentionally, shut the door to scientific enquiry. "The mystic way of the Sufi prescribed is incompatible with rational methods of science" and the accusation takes another form that "the Muslims, unfortunately, followed Al-Ghazali, and neglected, little by little, the study of sciences. Their once great civilization faded. On the other hand Ibn Rushd defended sciences and medieval Europe followed the way prescribed by him to attain it. This is the true spirit of Latin Averroeism which led to the rise of European Science.

This calumny first propagated in the West has, unfortunately, been taken up as a refrain by Muslim scholars of the present [2] day as well. I have, in all humility, attempted putting him in his correct historical perspective to defend Al-Ghazali against this persistent Calumny. Though Averroeism became a symbol of intellectual revolt in the 13th-14th Century Europe, Al-Ghazali's own [3] influence cannot be ignored or belittled. Influence of Muslim thought on the West is an engrossing subject as it played a significant part in sparking both the humanist and scientific movements. The later Reformation and the earlier Renaissance owed much to the borrowings from the East, writes MASARRAT HUSAIN ZUBERI

MOLWI MASOOD AALAM NADWI writes in his well known book "Muhammad Ibnê Abdul Wahab" - on the side commentary: "The Southern part of Najd has the famous town of Riyadh, the Capital of his (Wahabi) headquarters in Dariya. Both these villages are in the valley called Waadi Hanifa (situated in Najd)." (Pp/16)

Allama Dahlaan has quoted these Ahadith from the Sihaah: The Holy Prophet (Sallalaahu Alayhi Wasallam) said: "During the initial part of my Dawah in Mecca, I particularly invited the outside tribes who used to arrive during the Hajj season. From all these tribes the most hostile and ugly reaction was from the Banu Hanifa tribe." (The same tribe in, which Ibn-e-Abdul Wahab was born. He founded Wahabism which is being followed by the Tableeghi Jamaat) (Addarus Sunniah, pp/52)

He quotes a further Hadith: Hazrat Abu Bakr Siddiq (Radiallahu Anhu) reports that the Prophet (Sallalaahu Alayhi Wasallam) said: "From the tribes that live in Waadi Hanifa, fine shall emerge till the final era. That valley shall be notorious for its fine because of the rise of false leaders." (Pp/52)

Hazrat Imraan, the son of Hazrat Haseen (Radiallahu Anhu) reports that the Prophet (Sallalaahu Alayhi Wasallam) disliked three tribes lifelong. (1) Banu Saqeef (2) Banu Hanifa (3) Banu Umayya (Tirmizi Shareef)

Molwi Abdur Rahim Shah has confessed that he himself drew the attention of Molwi Yusuf Kandehlwi (son of Molwi Ilyas, founder of the Tableeghi Jamaat) to the internal corruption of the Jamaat. Each time his reminders were ignored.

We quote: "For approximately 5 to 6 years, I have been continuously drawing the attention of Moulana Yusuf to the glaring weaknesses of the Tableeghi Jamaat. I also stated to him that if he did not pay attention to these problems, the Ulema would not remain silent for long. They will be forced by circumstances to react and the end result can never be predicted." (Usoolé Dawató Tableeg, pp/46)

A frustrated man goes on to state his subsequent actions: "Finally, when I did not see a desirable result, I resorted to a lot of Istikaara and Duas. Alhamdulillah, when I was thoroughly convinced of the dangers of Tableeghi Jamaat and the harm inflicted on the Ummah, I openly began to rectify their mistakes in my lectures in the presence of the Tableeghi Jamaat." (Usoolé Dawatô Tableeg, pp/46)

From this very place the old workers of Tableeghi Jamaat start their action of ‘brainwashing’. Brain-washing is a technical term, which means that any new person should be changed to this extent mentally, that he may remain attached to the Jamaat only, detaching himself from everyone, and he must disassociate himself from everything of his past to adopt into the mental environment of the Jamaat. This action of brainwashing gradually moves forward. At the end of a journey again certain new people are initiated for a long journey. As a result of repeated rounds of preaching, the new people are strongly attached to the regional workers. This relationship gradually brings one so close to Tableeghi Jamaat, that after some time to pass the Chilla (religious penance) of forty days, a caravan of simple Muslims marches towards the Centre at Nizamuddin Delhi. Reaching there, they meet a group of artistic religious teachers (Ulema) of Tableeghi Jamaat under whose supervision and control they have to pass each moment of their days and nights. In a depressing environment of this mental training, everyday the world-wide progress and extension of Jamaat, the artificial piety of the Central Amir-e-Jamaat, the belief shaking explanations of the faith of the Unity of Allah, wrong interpretations of Polytheism (Shirk) and bad innovations (Bidah), and the desire-provoking descriptions of the dignitaries of Deoband, all these things influence the mind to the extent that ultimately they become the disciple of some ‘Sheik’ (Spiritual Guide), or they are initiated to become disciple. In this way they are made the mental-slaves of their Jamaat and its faith

Let us examine the meaning of Khatimun Nabiyeen as Muslims generally understand it, and also see as to whom the first man was to reject the generally accepted meaning. We quote a well-known Qadiani Book, printed in Pakistan, in which they have rightly quoted Maulvi Qasim Nanotwi’s interpretation of the concept of Khatimun Nabiyeen to prove the truth of Mizra Gulam Ahmed Qadiani. It states: "Muslims are unanimous that the Prophet (Sallallahu Alayhi Wasallam) is Khatimun Nabiyeen because the Quran bears testimony to this. Muslims are also unanimous that the word Khatimun Nabiyeen used in the Quran is in his praise and is pointing out his greatness. Now the only question is, what is the meaning of the word Khatimun Nabiyeen. Obviously Qasim Nanotwi Sahib, the founder of Darul Uloom Deoband, has rejected the generally understood meaning of this Quranic verse.

After laying down the foundations of the Tableeghi Jamaat in the Name of Islam, and in order to work out decided objectives, they felt the necessity of inflammatory literature, which will infuse into the minds of people, division and corrupt faith that will create different groups among Muslims, which will never unite!Therefore to accomplish this work the writing services of Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi were acquired, as Maulana Shabbir Ahmad Usmani has stated in "Makalamatus Sadrain". He said, addressing Maulana Hifzur Rahman in the same function at Calcutta: "Please see, Hazrat Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi was our acclaimed dignitary, in this connection we heard some people saying that he was being given an allowance of Six Hundred Rupees per month, by the British."(Makalamatus Sadrain, pp/11, Published at Deoband) Surely the British Government was not his disciple (Mureed) for it to forward this amount as Nazrana (Gift) for the Pir. Moreover, Nazarenes are presented occasionally; monthly payment means that it was the remuneration for services rendered! The burning question is, how did the British establish a link with Maulana Thanvi, and how did he end up on the British payroll?

The Delegation reaching Hijaz, reported to the Muslims of India: "The Graves (Shrines) of Jannatul Mualla were dismantled and the house where the Holy Prophet (Sallallahu Alayhi Wasallam) was born, was demolished, but the Najdi Government has assured us that it will not demolish or dismantle the Shrines of Madina similarly." (Report, Khilafat Committee, pp/43)

Again after one year in 1926, to review the condition created by the tyrannical hold of the Najdi Government in Hijaz, a world congregation was held during the Haj season at Mecca, and a Delegation of the Khalifat Committee was also sent to attend this conference under the auspices of Motamar-Alam-e-Islami.

In the book "Malfoozaté Ilyas", He (Maulana Manzoor Nomani ) writes, quoting one of his (Maulana Ilyas’s) statements: "He once said, ‘Hazrat Maulana Thanvi had done a great job, therefore it is my desire that his teachings be propagated amongst the masses and the method of preaching must be mine, so that his teaching will become popular among the public." (Malfoozat, pp/5 7)The structure of any missionary association has two parts, firstly teachings, and secondly the method of preaching. From these two if either is related to Islam then this association is qualified to be called an Islamic Association. But in the above statement of Maulana Ilyas the disturbing fact is that in both the aspects, neither is related to Allah and His Prophet (Sallallahu Alayhi Wasallam). The teachings of Thanvi Sahib and the method of preaching of Maulana Ilyas himself. This makes it quite clear that the real object of the Tableeghi Jamaat is not to propagate the teachings of the Holy Prophet (Sallallahu Alayhi Wasallam) but to propagate the teachings of Thanvi Sahib.

The Central leader of Tableeghi Jamaat, Maulvi Manzoor Nomani in his book called "Malfoozate Maulana Ilyas", writes: "Once he said that dream is the 46th part of Prophethood (He refers to Maulana Ilyas). Some people achieve such progress via a dream that it cannot be attained from prayer and penances, because in the dreams direct knowledge is revealed, which is a part of apostlehood then why will there be no progress?" (Malfoozate Maulana Ilyas, pp/51) .

Uptil now the discussion was an introduction to make the mind of followers even, now listen to the primary objective. "Again he said that nowadays, I am receiving the knowledge of realities, so try your utmost that I may get maximum sleep."(Malfoozate Maulana Ilyas, pp/51)At this point the statement of the Editor of Malfoozat shall not be devoid of interest. He writes: "On account of dryness my sleep was diminishing, then on the advice of the doctor and Hakim I started massaging my scalp with oil which increased the duration of my sleep."(Malfooz, pp/.51)

The Editor of "Malfoozat" writes: "Maulana Ilyas said that the method of this preaching was also manifested to me during a dream."(Malfoozat, pp /51). You will realise that this statement of Maulana Ilyas has brought to light all the hidden facts.

NewAgeIslam.com does not believe in sectarianism of any kind, but deems discussions and debates essential for clearing the atmosphere of doubt and stopping the mudslinging that keeps going on in the community as a matter of routine, with Ulema of one sect feeling no compunction in calling the ulema of other sects Kafirs and deviants, and indeed liable to be put to death. This is one reason why people professing belief in religions other than Islam have genuine difficulty in taking our claims of peacefulness seriously. We will publish all the eight chapters of Maulana Arshad Quadri’s book on Tableeghi Jamaat. We begin with the Question & Reply, Introduction, Foreword, Implication and Author’s experience. Anyone who disagrees with him on any point will be welcome to debate in our pages within the bounds of civilised and relevant discourse. That will only further the understanding of the Jamaat that is the purpose of the reproduction of this book.

Sultan Shahin, Editor, New Age Islam

1 2 ..38 39 40 41 42 43 44


Get New Age Islam in Your Inbox
E-mail:
Most Popular Articles
Videos

The Reality of Pakistani Propaganda of Ghazwa e Hind and Composite Culture of IndiaPLAY 

Global Terrorism and Islam; M J Akbar provides The Indian PerspectivePLAY 

Shaukat Kashmiri speaks to New Age Islam TV on impact of Sufi IslamPLAY 

Petrodollar Islam, Salafi Islam, Wahhabi Islam in Pakistani SocietyPLAY 

Dr. Muhammad Hanif Khan Shastri Speaks on Unity of God in Islam and HinduismPLAY 

Indian Muslims Oppose Wahhabi Extremism: A NewAgeIslam TV Report- 8PLAY 

NewAgeIslam, Editor Sultan Shahin speaks on the Taliban and radical IslamPLAY 

Reality of Islamic Terrorism or Extremism by Dr. Tahirul QadriPLAY 

Sultan Shahin, Editor, NewAgeIslam speaks at UNHRC: Islam and Religious MinoritiesPLAY 

NEW COMMENTS

  • ماشاء اللہ بہت خوب..
    ( By عبد الماجد )
  • @Nassar sb, I read your comment and have known your ideas.
    ( By Kaniz Fatma )
  • Ms Kaniz Fatm, Almost every sunni Muslim in India is a Hanafi and a Muqallid. So, what you say is understandable. Every.....
    ( By Naseer Ahmed )
  • @Miss KF, Comment 1 The early Muslims- companions [al-sahaba] and their followers and successors [tabiu’n] (Allah be pleased with all of them),....
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • Let us go by your definition of the verse: “4:34 is not about disloyalty or adultery. It is about obedience and disobedience. It is .....
    ( By Naseer Ahmed )
  • What is the point to be university students if they rebel against the authority that Allah has given to rulers? They who rebel against ...
    ( By zuma )
  • GM sb is stalking me in five different threads with nothing worthwhile to say. The windbag has infinite capacity to go on arguing ad infinitum ...
    ( By Naseer Ahmed )
  • The old fool fails to notice that unless Dharma is defined as the religion of Allah, it is meaningless. What is ....
    ( By Naseer Ahmed )
  • who do you think made up the story and why? '
    ( By Naseer Ahmed )
  • @Naseer sb, Sorry I am a Hanafi Muslima. Our learned jurists were honest and pious and they were ....
    ( By Kaniz Fatma )
  • Quran demands Muslims to obey rulers: Chapter 4 The Women سورة النساء - An-Nisa:. .
    ( By zuma )
  • They are well educated women and see it as a form of empowerment says the heading....
    ( By Rashid Samnakay )
  • Naseer sb. has been using deception to make 4:34 look good and he again tries to justify it and goes on to a totally irrelevant.....
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • Naseer sb., You have cleverly avoided responding to my comment. Why? Please respond to: "Naseer sb. says, "Verse....
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • Naseer sb., after making a fool of himself on the question of supremacism, is now resorting to personal abuse to divert....
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • Naseer sb. says a debaser only debases himself. That is good advice for him to follow himself. But. .
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • Do we need God to tell us how to distribute our inheritance? What did he give us our brains for?
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • Excellent article! The U.S. has gone too far in its anti-Palestinian policies, especially....
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • A well deserved success story! We need more Yasins.
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • Welcone back, Yunus sahib! Excellent article both from the point of view of the analysis of the problem and in recommending corrective measures..
    ( By Ghulam Mohiyuddin )
  • This is very good and worth reading article. His language and civilized and scholarly style of writing is praiseworthy.
    ( By Kaniz Fatma )
  • Accurate observations in true sense! Religious discourses should provide space for rationality to exist....
    ( By Meera )
  • Comment 3 پھر علامہ حامد رضا حجۃ الاسلام مزید رقمطراز ہی...
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • I refuse to believe that the gentleman in question genuinely thinks that girls should not go to .....
    ( By Imran Mohammed )
  • COMMENT 2 پھر علامہ حامد رضا رحمہ اللہ فرماتے ہیں : تو اس سلسلہ ہدایت رب العزت کا قائم فرمایا ہوا ....
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • Ms Kaniz Fatma, In the Prophet’s (pbuh) time, the Quran was well-understood....
    ( By Naseer Ahmed )
  • Without using Quran to interpret, weird teaching can derive from hadith alone....
    ( By zuma )
  • The hadith verse below even gives the weird view that only 700,000 of Muslims can go paradise and the rest cannot have the chance....
    ( By zuma )
  • More examples to prove how unreliable to use merely hadith for interpretation: Narrated Abu Huraira: Allah's Apostle said, "Allah welcomes two....
    ( By zuma )
  • Never use hadith alone for interpretation since it can derive with false teaching. The following is the extract: Narrated Abu Huraira: Allah's Apostle said....
    ( By zuma )
  • The first and foremost usul al-hadith should be to ignore the hadiths when the subject is covered by the Quran and go entirely by the ...
    ( By Naseer Ahmed )
  • Never rely merely on hadith since weird teaching can come out from hadith without relying Quran: Narrated Anas bin Malik: The Prophet led us in ...
    ( By zuma )
  • Direct interpretation with merely hadith would lead to weird teaching: Narrated Abu Murra: (the freed slave of Um Hani) Um Hani, the ....
    ( By zuma )
  • امام عارف باللہ عبد الوہاب شعرانی قدس سرہ الربانی کتاب مستطاب ‘‘میزان الشریعۃ الکبری ’’ میں اس معنی کو جا بجا بتفصیل تام بیان فرمایا ...
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • COMMENT 1 علامہ حامد رضا خان نے کیا ہی بات لکھی ، وہ فرماتے ہیں ‘‘مسلمانوں ! میں پہلے تمہیں ایک سہل ....
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • ‘‘احادیث نے فساد پیدا کیا اور قرآن کے خلاف کے لوگوں کو لا کھڑا کیا ’’ اس طرح کے خیال سے انتہائی غیر منصفانہ ...
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • Education is a bounty of Allah which is open to all regardless of gender. To deprive Muslim women of this bounty ....
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • Never read hadith alone since it would lead to misinterpretation. Let's take a look the hadith verse below: Narrated 'Ikrima: Some Zanadiqa (atheists....
    ( By zuma )
  • @Urooj, 1. Allah Almighty is free from every defect or shortcoming. 2. Everybody and everything ....
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )
  • Mr Austin, You can find your answer while reading this article thoroughly. I have also mentioned those names who have ....
    ( By Ghulam Ghaus Siddiqi غلام غوث الصديقي )