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Indian Press (08 Sep 2017 NewAgeIslam.Com)


Stamp out cow vigilantism: New Age Islam’s selection, 08 September 2017


New Age Islam Edit Bureau

Sep 8, 2017

From silence to speech

By Shashi Deshpande

Saffron voices chipping away at Modi’s persona

By S S Dhawan

Why floods are the new normal this monsoon

Hindustan Times

Myanmar connect: Bilateral ties on firm footing, but Naypyidaw needs to resolve Rohingya crisis

Times of India

Asif dashes to China to stem BRICS damage

Free Press Journal

Justice catches up with Mumbai blasts accused

Free Press Journal

No ‘Doklam dividend’

The Statemens

Vigil on vigilantes: on the Supreme Court's reminder

The Hindu

Trump Admin Backs Sale Of F-18/F-16 Fighter Jets To India

Daily Poineer

N Korea's Nuke Threat To China's Path To Power

Daily Pioneer

Compiled by New Age Islam Edit Bureau

URL: http://newageislam.com/indian-press/new-age-islam-edit-bureau/stamp-out-cow-vigilantism--new-age-islam’s-selection,-08-september-2017/d/112465


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Stamp out cow vigilantism

Asian Age

The Prime Minister has spoken in no uncertain terms on stopping violence in the cow’s name.

Sep 8, 2017, 12:15 am IST

The Supreme Court has given sage advice to governments on cow vigilantism. It asked every state to appoint a senior police official in each district to stop the vigilantes from violence in the name protecting cows.

The vigilantes must be brought to book promptly, the court said, with the Chief Justice also voicing concern and pointing out that a mechanism should be in place to arrest this deeply divisive mania. Cow vigilantism has spread disaffection and caused deaths too by lynching, which has no place in any civilised society. The ongoing litigation against the despicable practice also reminds us the Centre can’t abdicate its constitutional responsibility to instruct the states to take steps to save innocent lives from mob fury.

The Prime Minister has spoken in no uncertain terms on stopping violence in the cow’s name. The animal may have been revered for centuries, but there’s just no place for the depravity of indiscriminate attacks against those transporting cows due to misplaced confidence about the attackers being backed by false notions of the strength of majoritarianism. The zealots don’t seem to care about the damage done to social harmony by these brazen acts. They may feel encouraged in the current environment. The number of vigilante events, said to be 66 by one count, is a clear pointer to the frenzy fed also by videos of such violence being aired on the social media by mischievous elements. A court-directed system of accountability in law enforcement must be backed by governments walking the talk after condemning cow vigilantism.

asianage.com/opinion/edit/080917/stamp-out-cow-vigilantism.html

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From silence to speech

By Shashi Deshpande

Those who want to silence dissent are trying to force people into making the reverse journey

To hear the news of Gauri Lankesh’s death was like watching the replay of a movie I had seen before. Men came on a motorbike, shot her and then vanished. No one saw them. M.M. Kalburgi’s murder was eerily similar. There, too, the men came on a motorbike and, their job done, vanished. Nobody saw them. Kalburgi was a teacher and scholar, Gauri a journalist and activist, but they had this in common: They believed in speaking what they considered was the truth. It is now two years since Kalburgi’s death, but the men remain untraced. Now, once again there is a killing, once again the protests, the candle-lit vigils, the banners, the placards. Once again, the government promises an investigation, a search for the killers, but can we believe them? Is Gauri’s murder also going to remain an unsolved case?

When a murder takes place, the priority is obviously finding the killer. But perhaps in Gauri’s case, as in Kalburgi’s, even if the killers are found, it may provide only a partial answer to the question who. The killers in these cases, and in the earlier two cases of Narendra Dabholkar and Govind Pansare, were obviously professional assassins. Mercenaries, experienced in killing. Gauri’s killers came in the dark and vanished like ghosts. Why was Gauri killed is the next question.

All political parties have condemned the murder, all of them have expressed their shock. The Congress government even gave her a state funeral! There are conflicting theories doing the rounds, red herrings are dragged in. Kalburgi’s death was called the result of a property dispute by the investigating police and some politicians, the Naxalites hinted at in

Gauri’s death. Protesting on Gauri’s behalf seems like shadow boxing. Whom are we fighting? The murder seems to be surrounded by a dark fog of confusion. Is there a power behind the curtain operating the strings, making the moves? Or is that, too, a chimera? The one question that urgently demands an answer is: Are we now living in a country where people are killed because of their ideology, their beliefs? Are we living in a country where dissent is silenced by a bullet? Two years ago, there was a protest in India which began with writers and went on to embrace scientists, film-makers, social scientists, teachers and many others. This protest erupted after the killing of a man on the suspicion that he had eaten beef and because of the deaths of Dabholkar, Pansare and Kalburgi. In spite of the attempts of the government and its followers to trivialise and sully the issue, it was one of the most heartening movements of recent times, because the protestors had no political leanings and no agenda of their own — except to reassert the idea of India as a country of multiplicities, a country where each citizen has the right to live life the way she/he wants. Instead, we now have an idea of a country where one religion, one way of living, one culture, is the privileged one.

Gauri was a vehement anti-Hindutva person. She was hated for her views, she was called a Naxal sympathiser, a Hindu hater. But however strong her views, she posed no threat to those she opposed. Nor were the three men killed earlier any threat. And yet all of them were chosen targets, their murders well-planned. There is only one explanation for this; Gauri and the others were killed to send a message to all those who oppose this idea of India. The message is: If you dissent, we are waiting for you. To kill some and instil fears in many is a way of silencing people.

If you are not with us you are against us, President George W. Bush told the world after 9/11. This is exactly the way it is in India today. If you don’t agree with us, you are the enemy. There are footsoldiers who help by spewing venom on the social networking sites. Gauri, too, was attacked in the vilest terms. The abuses, the kind of things being said about her as a woman, the threats of gang rape, the rejoicing over her death — all these come out of sick minds.

Today, we are being told what being a patriot or a nationalist means. Those of us who have lived in this country all our lives and are tied to it by an umbilical cord are bewildered and angry. Do we need anyone to tell us how to love our country? Perhaps one of the things these deaths have told us is that one of the best ways of loving our country is refusing to be afraid, refusing to be silenced.

“The only way to keep ourselves free is to speak, not to let ourselves be silenced either by pernicious laws or by mob screaming” — the words of an American crime writer, Sara Paretsky, in an essay written after 9/11. She speaks of “every writer’s difficult journey” as a “movement from silence to speech”. Those who want to silence dissent are trying to force people into making the reverse journey — from speech to silence. But for a writer, for a journalist, silence is also death. Perumal Murugan knew it, which is why he announced the death of Perumal Murugan the writer when he decided to stop writing. Whoever they are, those who are trying to silence voices forget one thing: Silence one voice and a hundred, a thousand voices will take its place.

Gauri Lankesh is dead. She was a brave woman who tried to live a life according to her beliefs and convictions. Perhaps the protest meetings, the candle-lit vigils, the banners, the placards may be useful in making people aware of the person who died, of why the person died. And of how important it is to speak, to refuse to be afraid.

indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/from-silence-to-speech-gauri-lankesh-journalist-murder-4833497/

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Saffron voices chipping away at Modi’s persona

By S S Dhawan

Sep 08, 2017 08:01 am

Prime Minister Narendra Modi had painstakingly nurtured and created the persona of a decisive head of the government whose philosophy is very different from that of the fatigued Congress leaders. Even the die-hard sceptics had nursed a vain hope that Modi would change the national discourse and the Indian way of doing things. Likewise, he struck a chord with his captive audiences overseas and was seen to be a pragmatic idealist who understood the Indian idiom.

In a perception driven polity, the BJP too was able to successfully project that it alone is the harbinger of good governance – a beacon of hope for the nation which would readily give it even a bigger mandate in 2019.

Almost three years down the line, with the clock ticking away, such is the presumption that the party does not even talk of the two 18 months that remain of its tenancy, but of the magical year 2022 – the watershed moment when all the golden eggs of the BJP will hatch – including housing and power for all poor, double income for farmers, a digital and cashless society –essentially a new unstoppable India. Such is the condescending tone and the single minded obsession to chase numbers – for instance, ”skill training for 500 million people by 2022” – that the leadership is not unduly worried that empty promises would resonate across the nation in 2019 and could even boomerang on the party.

PM Modi is too shrewd a person not to realise that no nation can live on hubris alone; nor can people subsist on a staple diet of rhetoric, bluster and half-measures. But the PM is smug in the belief – rather he is convinced – and the party has internalised this view, that he has altered the fundamentals of our politics by establishing the BJP’s hegemony in the states – either by own mandate and, where that is not possible, by forging post poll opportunistic alliances, “depriving” the other mainstream party of its mandate, or by inflicting itself on the population by other means.

This, in turn, is expected to pave the way for a one man, single party, majoritarian rule for at least a decade. Theoretically speaking, India would of course remain a textbook democracy with multi-party elections but within this single party matrix. The pecking order at the Centre will be such that the smaller parties – mostly regional satraps – will be constrained to share the mandate with the only dominant party on the landscape – the BJP.

The co-option of the smaller players will ensure that an “ostracised” Congress cannot even win a municipality without political crutches; this will effectively confine it to national catchment areas like Puducherry, on the periphery of the political divide. However, such a fantasy is possible only if the already diminished Congress suffers some kind of national erosion. That should explain why the high decibel “malign Gandhis” project now goes well beyond outsourcing of the tirade to party mavericks, raking up the alleged legal infringements in the National Herald and lampooning the infirmities of Rahul Gandhi.

That should also explain the enthusiasm and audacious presumption with which the BJP spokespersons fritter away their energies on national TV in targeting the Gandhis, especially Rahul.

So, even as the PM has assumed the responsibility of ensuring that headlines stay effectively managed in a perception-driven polity and that he is seen as a development oriented leader, the RSS is weaving the alternative saffron narrative through the likes of Yogi Adityanath, whereby it hopes to polarise the population to an extreme. With this kind of dichotomy, there is no ideological confusion; so, in the RSS scheme of things Prime Minister Modi will take care of the political outpouring but the entire country is Yogi’s preserve – his canvas is far bigger, where he can inflict the saffron notions of cultural nationalism on us.

So far so good, but there is a snag:

There is an inherent occupational hazard in painstakingly building an entire political narrative around one’s own persona as PM Modi has done. Because the very mascots of Hindutva, by their conduct, which is at times incompatible with all-inclusive development, are deconstructing this myth, bit by bit. Similar saffron claims were made on prime minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, too, but he realised that this kind of template demands total conformism which will constrict his freedom of choice and tether his agenda of governance.

Also underlying the notion that the BJP has proprietary rights to good governance is an equally fallacious assumption that the ease of doing political business is facilitated if the same party has a government at the Centre and in the state. This power play is further couched in the simplistic reasoning that the Centre and the states need to work in tandem if fruits of development are to be shared.

But these fruits of development are neither visible on the ground, nor are they ripe to be plucked in the states where BJP is in control; nor do the people feel they are active participants in the growth process. We perhaps had a glimpse of this disconnect in Gorakhpur where red tape smothered 70-odd children with its fatal embrace! The recent derailments have also brought down the façade of development – the first big embarrassment for the prime minister.

Interestingly, the recent train derailments too have more to do with the Railways’ misplaced thrust on peripheral activities – services like Wifi, giving precedence to ‘pizza over passenger comfort,’ attempts to simulate aircraft like experience on board trains – rather than improving the existing the assets and infrastructure. All this again has to do with the perception driven political mindset.

In a perception driven economy – that is not based on reasonable growth assumptions – the layman, given his simplistic reasoning, gets into a “hopeful” mode and boards the never-ending merry-go-round. One can imagine his cynicism when he disembarks and realises that his level of suffering has enhanced. Instead of getting down to governance, the BJP has allowed itself to be distracted by frequent elections and simply frittered away its energies in chasing a mirage of Congress-mukt Bharat. Prime Minister Narendra Modi may continue to believe that he is doing a great job and that he has a tenacious hold on the power structure, but he is also allowing the saffron forces to marginalise him, thus diminishing his room for political manoeuvre. That is neither good for the BJP, nor for PM Modi, in a perception driven polity.

freepressjournal.in/analysis/saffron-voices-chipping-away-at-modis-persona-s-s-dhawan/1133495

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Why floods are the new normal this monsoon

Hindustan Times

Climate change will only increase as weather and rainfall will only get more variable, more extreme and more catastrophic.Since rain will come in more ferocious events, we must engineer for its storage and drainage

The Indian monsoon is never really ‘normal’. It rains too much or too little. It is variable and more than often unpredictable. But now the very definition of what is ‘normal’ is changing. The fact is that Indian monsoon is becoming more extreme and more variable. In this way, the new normal is flood at the time of drought.

This year, even as 40% of the districts in India face prospects of drought, close to 25% districts have had heavy rainfall of more than 100 mm in just a matter of hours. This year, even as the overall average rainfall in the country is below normal – deficient – large parts have received much more than their share of rain and worse, this rain came down in a matter of hours.

Chandigarh, a city of open parks, was recently submerged in water. It had deficient rainfall till August 21, and then it got 115 mm of rain in just 12 hours. It drowned. In other words, it got roughly 15% of its annual monsoon rain in just a few hours. Bengaluru hardly had any rain and then it poured. It got 150 mm of rain in just about a day, which is close to 30 per cent of its annual monsoon rain. It is no wonder that the city drowned. Mount Abu got over half its annual monsoon rain in two days. Then Mumbai got some 300 mm of rain – some 15% of its annual in just hours.

This should not surprise us. Models have predicted that the first impact of a changing climate would be on increased frequency and intensity of weird and extreme weather events. It was also predicted that South Asia – our region – would be worst hit by extreme rain events. It is happening. What should worry us is that models have predicted that this would only get worse as temperatures rise.

This is a double whammy. On the one hand, we are getting our water management wrong—we are building in floodplains, destroying our water-bodies and filling up our water channels. Mumbai or Chandigarh or Bengaluru did not drown only because of extreme rain. They drowned also because all drainage systems have been willfully destroyed. Our city developers only see land for building; not land for water. Now, the changing climate will make this mismanagement even more deadly.

Just consider the facts. This year, up to mid-August, India has had 16 extremely heavy rain events, defined as rainfall over 244 mm in a day and 100 heavy rain events defined as rainfall between 124 to 244 mm in a day. This means that rain will become a flood. Worse, in met records, the rain will be shown as normal, not recognising that it did not rain when it was most needed for sowing or that the rain came in just one downpour. It came and went. It brought no benefits. Only grief.

It is time we understood this reality. This means learning to cope with twin scenarios, all at once. This means being obsessive about how to mitigate floods and how to live with scarcity of water. But the good news is that doing one can help the other. But we need to stop debating, dithering or dawdling. We know what to do. And we have no time to lose — climate change will only increase with time as weather and rainfall will only get more variable, more extreme and more catastrophic.

The answer to floods is what has been discussed for long. In fact, it was practised in these flood-prone regions many decades ago. It requires planning systems that can divert and channelise water so that it does not flood land and destroy life. It means linking rivers to ponds, lakes and ditches so that water is free to flow. This will distribute the water across the region and bring other benefits. It will recharge groundwater so that in the subsequent months of low rainfall, there is water for drinking and irrigation. It will also ensure that there is food during the flood period, as wetlands are highly productive in terms of fish and plant food.

Clearly, it is time to accept that we are beginning to see the impact of climate change. It is time to demand that the world change its ways to mitigate emissions. It is equally important we change the way we deal with water. The opportunity lies in making sure that every drop of the rain is harvested for future economic use. Since rain will come in more ferocious events we must engineer for its storage and drainage. Channelising and holding rain water must become the nation’s mission.

This does mean that every water body, every channel, drain, nullah and every catchment has to be safeguarded. These are the temples of modern India. Built to worship rain. Built for our future.

Mitigating floods and droughts has only one answer: obsessive attention to building millions and millions of connected and living water structures that will capture rain, be a sponge for flood and storehouse for drought. The only question is: when will we read the writing on the wall? Get on with it. Get it right.

hindustantimes.com/analysis/why-floods-are-the-new-normal-this-monsoon/story-HqgezTSRNHKYSYIzWJgWzH.html

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Myanmar connect: Bilateral ties on firm footing, but Naypyidaw needs to resolve Rohingya crisis

Times of India

September 8, 2017, 2:00 AM IST

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s first bilateral visit to Myanmar has reaffirmed relations with a crucial neighbouring country. New Delhi and Naypyidaw share a time-tested bond that even withstood international sanctions against Myanmar during the latter’s military regime. Today, when Myanmar is in the process of democratisation and is opening up to the world, India’s role in building Myanmarese infrastructure and institutions assumes greater significance. A total of 11 agreements have been signed between the two sides during this visit, spanning areas like maritime security, strengthening democratic institutions in Myanmar, health and information technology.

Given the history of insurgencies in India’s northeast, New Delhi would like more help from Naypyidaw in securing the common border and dismantling anti-India militant camps operating from Myanmarese soil. Groups like the dreaded NSCN (Khaplang) continue to find refuge in Myanmar and conduct guerrilla operations against Indian security forces. Besides, trade and connectivity between the northeast and Myanmar is vital for actualising India’s Act East policy from which Naypyidaw too stands to benefit.

That said, it can’t be ignored that Modi’s visit comes against the backdrop of the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar’s Rakhine state. An estimated 1,25,000 Rohingyas have fled to neighbouring Bangladesh after Myanmar’s security forces initiated a crackdown in the wake of attacks against police and army posts blamed on an armed Rohingya group. But Rohingyas have been facing discrimination for decades in Myanmar where they are not recognised as citizens – despite living there for generations – and have been at the receiving end of violence perpetrated by Buddhist extremists.

In fact, Myanmar’s latest crackdown against Rohingyas has been described in some quarters as genocide with reports of murder, rape and torture of civilians filtering in. Particularly shocking has been the stubborn refusal of Myanmar’s state counsellor and Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi to recognise the plight of Rohingyas. Suu Kyi can’t be selective about championing human rights. On New Delhi’s part, it’s understandable that Modi doesn’t want to rub Naypyidaw the wrong way and push it into Beijing’s orbit, as the Chinese have no human rights scruples. Yet, he could have done more to impress upon Myanmar’s leadership the need to provide Rohingyas with citizenship. Domestically New Delhi should rescind its deportation order against Rohingya refugees, which is in terrible taste considering they are facing such brutality in Myanmar.

blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/toi-editorials/myanmar-connect-bilateral-ties-on-firm-footing-but-naypyidaw-needs-to-resolve-rohingya-crisis/

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Asif dashes to China to stem BRICS damage

Free Press Journal

Sep 08, 2017 08:07 am

It is a measure of the perceived damage that the inclusion of Pakistani terror outfits Jaish e-Mohammed (JeM) and Lashkar e-Taiba (LeT) in the list of terrorist organizations by the BRICS summit declaration in Beijing has done to Pakistan’s image across the world that its foreign minister Khawaja Mohammad Asif has had to rush to Beijing to talk things over with the Chinese establishment. This is the second successive blow for the Pakistanis after US President Donald Trump recently warned Pakistan of consequences if it continued to support terror groups against India and Afghanistan. While the US warning jolted Islamabad, the Chinese signatures on a document that the BRICS heads of government released on terrorism in the region has sent shock waves across Pakistan. China has been an all-weather friend of Pakistan over the years and it is largely because of Chinese support that Islamabad has been cocking a snook at India, unconcerned about the reputation that it has earned of being a world crucible of terror.

Pakistan on Tuesday rejected the BRICS declaration, saying there was no “safe haven” for terrorists on its soil, but the China visit of Asif is an index that Islamabad is rattled and is looking for a word of support from the Chinese for whatever it is worth. The Chinese, if they are concerned about their friend’s negative image, must tell Asif some home truths. After the Beijing visit Mohammed Asif is expected to visit Turkey, China, and Russia for consultations on the new South Asia policy of the US. But critical to Asif’s tour would be the assurances that he is able to get from China. There can be little doubt that Chinese President Xi realizes that too much closeness with Pakistan is causing China acute embarrassment. In stonewalling Indian efforts for the UN to declare JeM chief Masood Azhar as an international terrorist with sanctions being imposed against him, China is being increasingly isolated and being seen as an abettor of terrorism. With the Chinese Communist Party plenary coming up next month, President Xi is keen to refurbish his image. At the same time, he realizes that Pakistan’s support is crucial in going through with the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor which will give Beijing tremendous strategic advantage.

freepressjournal.in/analysis/asif-dashes-to-china-to-stem-brics-damage/1133507

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Justice catches up with Mumbai blasts accused

Free Press Journal

Sep 08, 2017 08:04 am

The 1993 Mumbai blasts case finally reached fruition in a special Terrorist and Disruptive Activities (Prevention) Act (TADA) court on Thursday and will now go to the high court a good 24 years after the deadly blasts ripped through Mumbai (then called Bombay) killing 257 people and injuring 713 innocents. For those who lost their next of kin it indeed has been an extraordinarily long and torturous wait for justice. The special court awarded death sentence to Taher Mohammed Merchant and Firoz Abdul Rashid Khan and sentenced Abu Salem and Karimullah Osan Khan to life imprisonment with a fine of Rs.2 lakh each. Another accused, Riyaz Ahmed Siddiqui, was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment. The mastermind of the blasts, Dawood Ibrahim and many other accused had fled to Pakistan and have escaped punishment for now by evading the law. It is an open secret that Dawood is being persistently shielded with connivance of the Pakistan government, which brazenly denies that this underworld don and fugitive is being sheltered there. Abu Salem and his then paramour Monica Bedi had escaped to Portugal after the blasts but were extradited to India in 2005 with the Portuguese government extracting a commitment from the then Indian government led by Atal Bihari Vajpayee that he would not be awarded the death penalty and would not be jailed for a period beyond 25 years. While the special court has awarded him life imprisonment, it is now for the Modi government to commute it to 25 years imprisonment in line with the Indian government’s commitment to Portugal.

A series of 13 blasts in quick succession had ripped through various locations of India’s financial capital on March 12, 1993. The targets included the Air India Building, the Bombay Stock Exchange, Zaveri Bazar, hotels SeaRock and Juhu Centaur. Property worth Rs.27 crore was damaged. That only two accused have been given death sentence now and one, Yakub Memon was hanged earlier makes one wonder whether justice has been done adequately. That there was a deep-rooted conspiracy of which State or non-State actors in Pakistan were a part exacerbated the heinousness of the crime. While international pressure needs to be built up on the Pakistan government to own up to Dawood’s presence in Pakistan and to extradite him to India to face the law, a stricter view needs to be taken of the role of other conspirators in the heinous act. The High Court which would now take up the prosecution’s appeal for enhancement of sentence must look upon this as a rarest of rare case because innocent lives were lost in the most tragic of circumstances en masse.

freepressjournal.in/analysis/justice-catches-up-with-mumbai-blasts-accused/1133502

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No ‘Doklam dividend’

The Statemens

September 8, 2017 | 2:26 am

At a point in time when satisfaction and relief was being expressed over the successful diplomatic resolution of the Sino-Indian stand-off at Doklam, the Chief of the Army Staff has emphasised the need to “keep the powder dry” ~ and reiterated the military’s theory that India must remain prepared to fight on two fronts.

Since Gen Bipin Rawat was hand-picked for the job, few would believe that his seemingly “out of sync” comment was made off his own bat, there would be suspicions that it was part of a larger message that New Delhi was seeking to deliver to Beijing.

The reaction from the external affairs ministry might help clarify the picture, but the Chief’s observations would seem at variance with the Foreign Secretary’s line that the latest bilateral interaction of the Chinese and Indian leadership after the BRICS summit was “forward looking”.

More significant would be the way in which the Chief’s statement is “read” in China, both its official spokespersons and commentators had been belligerent during the 73- day impasse at the Sino-Indian-Bhutanese trijunction, and an earlier comment from Gen Rawat about fighting on two fronts had provoked vicious rhetoric.

It is to be hoped that the Chief did not resort to fauji talk because he was addressing a military audience at a think-tank in New Delhi, he must have been alive to the reality that given the current context every word of his would be scrutinised, the “simple soldier” explanation will not suffice.

While Gen Rawat analysed the potential for conflict with both Pakistan and China, his observations on the Northern front assumed special significance since the situation at the trijunction had been explosive until a few days back. “As far as the northern adversary is concerned, the flexing of muscle has started.

The salami slicing, taking over territory in a very gradual manner, testing our limits of threshold is something we have to be wary about, and remain prepared for situations emerging which could gradually emerge into conflict.”

He also noted that China had engaged in psychological warfare by using the media and information technology during the Doklam face-off. Not surprisingly he rejected the notion that credible deterrence could prevent war and sought adequate budgetary provision for the military. Nor did he subscribe to the view that a nuclearised environment averted conflict.

“Nuclear weapons are weapons of deterrence. Yes they are. But to say that they can deter war or they will not allow nations to go to war, in our context may also not be true.”

During the eyeball-to-eyeball logjam at Doklam the Indian establishment has opted for very measured commentary, refused to be tempted into a rhetoric-roughhouse. Hence the Chief’s falling back on tough talk is a trifle surprising unless part of an unfolding game-plan.

thestatesman.com/opinion/no-doklam-dividend-1502489139.html

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Vigil on vigilantes: on the Supreme Court's reminder

The Hindu

SEPTEMBER 08, 2017 00:15 IST

is a telling commentary on our times that it needs the Supreme Court to remind those in power that they cannot remain silent while vigilantes take the law into their own hands in the name of cow protection. Sending out a stern message that the time has come to end the activities of aggressive gau rakshaks, the court has asked the States and Union Territories to appoint nodal police officers in each district to crack down on such mobs. The order came after the counsel for Haryana, Gujarat, Maharashtra and Rajasthan offered to appoint such district nodal officers to check vigilante groups and act promptly whenever offences take place. For over a year now, instances of groups beating up and even killing persons allegedly suspected of transporting cattle or bovine meat have become commonplace. The court had issued notices to the Centre and some States in April on a writ petition that demanded action against such cow protection groups. In the few months since then, more incidents of lynching have taken place. Villagers killed two persons transporting cattle in West Bengal less than two weeks ago. Three persons were killed in the same State in June after they were accused of cattle theft. Three persons were beaten up last month in Bihar. In more than one State, cow ‘protectors’ have legal recognition as local laws provide immunity to them if they were acting in good faith. The validity of such provisions in laws aimed at banning or regulating slaughter of animals and protecting the cow may be decided in the course of these proceedings.

Curbing cow vigilantism requires an obvious change in the police’s approach to these incidents. In most cases, they register cases against the victims for slaughter or theft of cattle. Typically, the administration seems eager to determine if they were engaged in cow slaughter or transportation of bovine meat than in arresting the culprits involved in murder and violence. A related question is whether the Centre ought to take recourse to Article 256, which empowers it to issue directions to the States, to put an end to the activities of vigilantes, instead of shirking its responsibility on the ground that this is essentially a law and order issue to be addressed by the States. The Centre can no more ignore its credibility deficit because of the ruling dispensation’s ideological commitment to cow protection. It has to respond meaningfully to the charge that it is soft on vigilantism and is keen on pushing animal slaughter rules aimed at making life difficult for those engaged in the cattle trade for their livelihood. Prime Minister Narendra Modi declared a few months ago that killing people in the name of cow worship is unacceptable. The law and the way it is administered must demonstrate that these are not empty words.

thehindu.com/opinion/editorial/vigil-on-vigilantes/article19638263.ece

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Trump Admin Backs Sale Of F-18/F-16 Fighter Jets To India

Daily Poineer

Friday, 08 September 2017

Taking the stand that India needs to be “a net security provider” in the Indo-Pacific region, the Trump administration has let it be known that it “strongly supports” the sale of F-18 and F-16 fighter jets to New Delhi.

In a testimony before a Congressional committee on Thursday, Acting Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs Alice Wells said the F-18 and F-16 fighter proposals put forth by Boeing and Lockheed Martin have the potential to take the bilateral defense relationship to the next level.

“We strongly support these transfers. If India can seize these opportunities we can enhance interoperability between our militaries and support thousands of jobs in both countries,” she said.

As Wells put it, President Trump’s first meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi last June “set a positive tone and ambitious agenda for strengthening bilateral ties, particularly in the areas of defence, energy, and trade”, with defence and security cooperation continuing to be a central pillar of the bilateral partnership.

While Modi’s address to the joint session of Congress last year captured the energy and excitement defining this partnership, Trump is on record that the relationship between the two nations “has never been stronger, has never been better”, she said.

   Wells noted that the US’s designation of India as a “Major Defence Partner” would give a further boost to bilateral defence trade that has already risen to over $15 billion over the past decade.

“Defense sales increase our security cooperation while also generating jobs at home,” she said, adding the State Department was committed to advocating on behalf of American companies as they compete for defence deals in the Indian market.

“The reason defense cooperation with India is so vital to U.S. interests is because we need India to be a net security provider in the Indo-Pacific, a region that serves as the fulcrum of global trade and commerce, with nearly half of the in the world’s 90,000 commercial vessels – many sailing under the U.S. flag – and two thirds of 4 traded oil traveling through the region,” she said.

On counter-terrorism cooperation, projected as a critical priority for both India and the United States, Well commented: “India is situated in a dangerous neighbourhood, where terrorist attacks have killed both Indians and Americans alike.”

While highlighting the need to step up joint training and capacity building to expand the counter- terrorism cooperation, she said more than 1,100 Indian security personnel have received training through the department’s Anti-Terrorism Assistance programme since 2009.

Turning to economic cooperation, she said bilateral trade has shot up from $45 billion in 2006 to more than $114 billion in 2016, adding US exports to India were supporting more than 260,000 American jobs across all 50 states.

Economic relationship, as she put it, has largely been on a positive trajectory. Even so, America needs to do more to balance the trade deficit between the two countries, which totalled nearly $30 billion last year.

“We are working closely with USTR and the commerce department to address the concerns of the US business community regarding India, including tariff and non-tariff barriers, subsidies, localisation policies, restrictions on investment, and intellectual property concerns that limit market access and impede US exporters and businesses from entering the Indian market,” Wells said.

dailypioneer.com/world/trump-admin-backs-sale-of-f-18f-16-fighter-jets-to-india.html

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N Korea's Nuke Threat To China's Path To Power

Daily Pioneer

Friday, 08 September 2017

Two years ago Liu Yunshan, the visiting Chinese dignitary, and Kim Jong Un, the North Korean leader, tried to put on a show of friendship, chatting amiably as the cameras rolled, but just as often they stood silent, staring ahead as a military parade passed before them.

The stretch of time is a sign of the distance between two nations with a torturous history: one a rising power seeking regional dominance, the other an unpredictable neighbor with its own ambitions.

China has made little secret of its long-term goal to replace the United States as the major power in Asia and assume what it considers its rightful position at the center of the fastest-growing, most dynamic region in the world.

But North Korea, which defied Beijing by testing a sixth nuclear bomb on Sunday, has emerged as an unexpected and persistent obstacle.

Other major hurdles litter China's path. The United States, despite signs of retreat in Asia under the Trump administration, remains the dominant military power. And India and Japan, China's traditional rivals in the region, have made clear that they intend to resist its gravitational pull.  

dailypioneer.com/world/n-koreas-nuke-threat-to-chinas-path-to-power.html

URL: http://newageislam.com/indian-press/new-age-islam-edit-bureau/stamp-out-cow-vigilantism--new-age-islam’s-selection,-08-september-2017/d/112465




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