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Islamic Ideology (28 Oct 2013 NewAgeIslam.Com)



Are All The Mushrikin For All Times “Spiritually Unclean” (Rijz) (Literal Reading Of The Verse 9:28 Of The Qur’an)?

 

 

 

 

An introspective probe into Sura al Tawbah that puts many of its so called sword verses in their historical perspective and calls for broadening the horizons of Islamic supplication (Du’a) to include the polytheists and atheists – dead or alive.  

By Muhammad Yunus, New Age Islam

Co-author (Jointly with Ashfaque Ullah Syed), Essential Message of Islam, Amana Publications, USA, 2009

October 29, 2013

The theme needs no introduction or any beating about the bush as the issue dominates current hermeneutic narratives and polemical debates and must be understood in the historical context of the Qur’an and in light of its holistic message.  

Those who insist on literalist interpretation must admit that any literalist interpretation of the Qur’an will call for, among other things, employing birds of prey to hunt for food (5:4), journeying to Mecca on lean mounts (22:27), resisting an invasion by standing firm like a solid block in the battlefield (61:4) and having a cavalry division in the armed forces (8:60). Hence, literalism can cause immense confusion and kill the liberating and dynamic spirit of the Qur’an - its call to probe its verses (39:18, 47:24), seek its best meaning (39:18, 39:55) and use reason (‘Aql) and cognitive faculty (Fiqha) to come to the right judgment (Rushd) on issues. Therefore, we must not draw any conclusion from any single verse of the Qur’an and take account of its historic context and holistic message to properly comprehending its message. With this we delve into the Qur’an, which, having been uttered, recorded and memorized at the same historical point is of undoubted authenticity [1], though we draw on the exegetic sources as relevant.

As the exegetes unanimously agree, the 9the Sura (al Tawbah) of the Qur’an (featuring the verse 9:28) was revealed during the closing years of the revelation, covering the period between the integration of Mecca (8 H/ 630 CE) through the demise of the Prophet (10/ 632). It was a period of great instability and uncertainties in the new (Muslim) community which had risen like a phoenix from desert sand under the spell of the Qur’an and singular drive of its Prophet, and with his advancing age, its future hung in the balance.

The Attitude of the Hypocrites

The hypocrites of Medina who had covertly opposed the Prophet and conspired against him since his arrival in Medina (622 CE) had become desperate and along with the pagan tribes (the mushrikin) were conspiring to get rid of the Prophet. Meanwhile, the Prophet was planning very hazardous mission (631) up north to the outer fringes of the mighty Roman Empire – some 350 miles across barren desert terrain. In military terms, the mission was doomed to total annihilation in view of immense military superiority, organizational skill, battle experience, strict drilling regime, defensive position and logistic advantages of the Imperial Army. Accordingly, the hypocrites among the Prophet’s followers detested the mission. With this introduction, we probe deeply into the Qur’an’s fragmentary records (printed in italics, paraphrased) leading up to the captioned proclamation.

As the mission was hazardous and journey long, the hypocrites made excuses to the Prophet and sought exemption from the mission (9:42, 9:49), which he granted (9:43). The hypocrites, who stayed back, were glad to have opposed the Prophet and boasted that they did not like to go forth in the heat (9:81). As they laughed in their hearts (at Muhammad’s folly) the revelation reminds them that they will weep a lot (9:82). They built a mosque rivalling the mosque of the Prophet, as a rallying point for those opposed to the Prophet, but they later swore that they had good intentions (9:107). The revelation refers to this mosque as a building founded on the brink of a crumbling bank of eroded earth, crumbling into the fire of hell (9:109) – a building that could never cease to be a source of doubt in their hearts until their hearts were detached (9:110).  It forbids the believers to stand in it, and declares that it was more fitting that they should stand in the first mosque that the Prophet had founded on Taqwa (God consciousness/Moral uprightness) (9:108).

As the Prophet returned from his mission, the revelation declares that the hypocrites may be rightly reproached as they were fully able (to go forth with him) (9:93). As the hypocrites made excuses, the revelation asked them to make no excuses (9:94). They swore by God to the Prophet to spare them (any punishment), and the  revelation asked the Prophet to spare them as they were spiritually unclean (Rijz) for whom the hell was a more fitting abode (9:95). They swore to the Prophet hoping that their pleadings might soften his heart, but God condemned them as deviants (Fasiqun) (9:96). At the same time, the nomadic Arabs were harshly reproved for being most stubborn in their denial (of the Prophet’s mission) (Kufr) and hypocrisy (Nifaq) (9:97).   

As in the divine scheme, the Prophet had hardly a year before him – he died in 632; the hypocrites were to be integrated to avoid the disintegration of the Muslim community soon after his death. Accordingly, the Qur’an adopts a stern tone against them.

It declares that the hypocrite men and women were of the same kind. They enjoined the evil, and forbade the good, and held back their hands. They were oblivious of God and God was oblivious of them, and without doubt, they were the deviants (Fasiqun) (9:67). It declares that God had promised them as well as the pagan opponents (Kuffar), the fire of hell and that was enough for them, and God had cursed them and a lasting punishment was in store for them (9:68). It reminded them that almost every year they were tested; yet they declined to repent (9:126). It commands the Prophet to continue his struggle against the pagans (Kuffar) and the hypocrites and to be firm with them (9:73).     

The revelation asks the Prophet to tell the hypocrites who volunteered to take part in any ensuing expedition that they would not go out with him as they refused the first time (9:83). It forbids the Prophet to pray over any of them who had died, nor to stand by his grave (9:84) and tells him that even if he sought forgiveness for them seventy times, God will never forgive them (9:80).

The Unrelenting Hostility of the Pagans

Meanwhile, the pagans remained unrelentingly hostile. Whenever they came upon the Muslims, they defied the treaty (of Hudaibiyyah) and disregarded even blood ties (9:10). They pleased the Muslims with their mouths, but there was aversion in their hearts (9:8). The revelation exhorts the Muslims to kill such archetypes of defiance (Kufr) who broke their oaths after pledging them, and defamed their religion (9:12), and who had previously planned to exile the Messenger and were the first to attack them (9:13), and assures them that God will help them against their enemies, bring disgrace upon them and soothe the bosoms of those who believe (9:14). Finally, on the day of the Great hajj (9/631), the revelation gives an ultimatum of four months to the hostile pagans who were repeatedly breaking their treaty obligations (9:1-3), and commands the Muslims to kill, capture, blockade and ambush them after the expiry of this period unless they repented, kept up prayer and contributed to Zakah (9:5, 9:11). However, those among the pagans (mushrikin) with whom the Muslims had a treaty and who were honouring them and not helping anyone against the Muslims were to be given time until the treaty term expired (and not to be coerced to embrace faith) (9:4), while those who sought protection were to be given protection, until they heard the word of God and then to be delivered to a place of security (i.e. their tribal homelands) (9:6).

The exemption of the friendly pagan tribes from the ultimatum obviously created confusion in the status of the Sacred Mosque (Masjid al Haram): the Muslims using it for pure worship of Allah while the pagans of friendly tribes having treaty alliances with the Muslims bringing their idols into it. This paradox had to be corrected immediately as the divine scheme was aware of the imminent death of the Prophet. The Qur’an therefore declares that the pagans were spiritually unclean (Rijz) and were not permitted to approach the Sacred mosque (Masjid al Haram) [2] after that year. Since this meant loss of trade and gifts from the pilgrims, the Muslims were assured that God would enrich them from His bounty, if He wills (9:28). The revelation also forbade the Prophet and the believers from asking forgiveness for the pagans even if they were relatives as it had become clear to them that they were the inmates of the blaze (9:113).

Probing the Verse 9:28 against the Above Setting

The foregoing construction of the circumstances leading up to the revelation of this verse based on the Qur’an’s testimony irrefutably demonstrates its existential character. There can no doubt that the Qur’an condemned the stubbornly recalcitrant and unrelentingly hostile pagans of the era who were bent on thwarting the Prophet’s mission, as spiritually unclean (Rijz), but it used the same word for the hypocrites among the Muslims as well (9:95). The Qur’an also described some of the nomadic Arabs from among his followers as intense in Kufr (denial of the Prophet’s mission or atheism in a generic sense) and hypocrisy and consigned them to hell (9:97) as noted above. The question is: Are we going to take these and other similar admonitions of God directed at a people whose sole object was to obliterate Islam that the divine scheme had ordained for humanity. The Arab pagans and hypocrites of the era were engaged in a war against God – they are described as the enemies of God and the Prophet (8:60). Are we going to regard all the hypocrite Muslims and unbelievers or ‘mushrikin’ for all times as God’s enemy and spiritually unclean (Rijz) as their counterparts of the Prophet’s era?

Probing deep into the Qur’an, one can see that it came with a clear agenda: to bring humanity out of darkness into light (14:1, 57:9) and to lift the burden that lay upon it from before (7:157). Given the all pervading moral degradation of pre-Islamic Arabia and the global human society at large, the Qur’an was up against an almost impossible task, which it aimed at accomplishing through human institutions - that is, without direct divine intervention by way of a miracle. Therefore, like all social revolutions in human history, it needed a core ideology which had to serve as the bedrock of all its ensuing reforms. The Qur’an’s mission statement was very simple and straightforward: ‘There is no deity but God’ – a declaration of pure monotheism that virtually annulled Arab paganism with all its 360 odd idols, arbitrary and cruel tribal mores and concomitant vices. Hence, any form of atheism and polytheism stood as an anathema to its core ideology - the greatest and unpardonable sin. But whether God will forgive the foremost in good deeds and moral integrity among the atheists and polytheists of a later era or regard them as God’s enemy or spiritually unclean (Rijz) must be left to Him to decide and cannot be deduced from the Qur’an as a priori. The precarious existential dimension and virtual impossibility of any success of the Prophetic mission rendered it unparalleled in human history. Therefore, its proclamation relating to existential issues must also be treated as part of its closed unparalleled history, and not any eternal precedent. 

From a different perspective, in the divine scheme, all humanity, including the atheists and polytheists are inspired with a conscience (Taqwa) – an inborn morality, a notion of good and evil, and at Final Reckoning, God will judge all including the atheists and polytheists based on deeds and Taqwa (22:17). Thus, it may be misleading to take the Qur’anic admonitions to the Meccan Kuffar and mushrikin, who were bent on thwarting the divine scheme and thus acted veritably as the enemies of God (8:60) binding upon atheist and polytheists for all times.

Furthermore, it is a historical fact that the Prophet led the funeral prayer for the chief of the hypocrites, Abdullah Ibn Ubayy who died two months after his return from Tabuk – some 150 miles from Medina, the end point of his perilous ‘Roman’ expedition. When reminded of the Qur’anic prohibition against seeking forgiveness for the hypocrites (9:84), the Prophet is reported to have said that he would seek forgiveness for more than seventy times (9:80 above) to earn his forgiveness.

The Qur’an also offers a similar illustration in its fifth Sura (al-Maidah). When God said to Prophet Jesus whether he had asked his followers to deify him and his mother, he instantly denied having made any such suggestion (5:116-117) and made this supplication to God: ‘If You punish them, they are Your servants; if you forgive them, You are Mighty, Wise’ (5:119). So, notwithstanding what the Qur’an says about the hypocrites and the mushrikin, we humans have no basis to apply God’s vocabulary to our fellow humans with whom we are asked to have cordial interaction (49:13) and to collaborate in goodness and Taqwa (moral uprightness) (2:148, 5:2, 5:48).

Conclusion:

In consideration of the foregoing Qur’anic illustrations, any suggestion to regard polytheists and atheists and any other category of unbelievers post the revelation era as spiritually unclean (Rijz) stands untenable. This demeaning word was directed to the highly recalcitrant pagan Arabs of the Prophet’s era, who, for more than 20 years at a stretch, violently resisted his mission to establish Islam as an historical reality and are described as the enemies of God as well as the Prophet (8:60). Islam became a historical reality as the revelation came to a close and with this closed the history of its mission. Hence, any community paralleling the Arab pagans of the Prophet’s with the divine stigma of Rijz are no more to encountered, and if so God alone knows the pure from the Rijz - it is not for the Muslim to claim moral purity (Zakah) (53:32) by slapping this stigma on the ‘mushrikin’ and atheists of their era.

This opens up the question of allowing the mushrikin and atheists to pay a visit to the Sacred Mosque if they so desire, despite the incongruity of their religious thoughts/ intellect with this ancient symbol of monotheism (9:17). This certainly needs deep reflection. Notwithstanding the verse 9:28, literally barring the mushrikin from approaching the Sacred Mosque, the engineering, design, construction and beautification of its superstructure may have received considerable inputs from the atheists and mushrikin. What sin may be there to allow these people to visit the Sacred Mosque, which the Qur’an describes as a resort for all humanity, a sanctuary (2:125)? God alone knows! This writer has attempted to draw the best meaning of the Qur’an (39:18, 39:55) and if he has gone overboard, for all its warnings in the Sura al Tawbah, God also promises to turn in mercy to whom He wills for God is Most Forgiving and Most Merciful (9:27).

The arguments tabled on the strength of the Qur’an can also help in expanding the horizon of Islamic thoughts to include the atheists and polytheist, dead or alive, in their prayers despite the prohibition that a literal reading of the verse 9:80 imposes. This is urgently needed to enable the Muslims to play their role as scripturally the most balanced community (2:143). 

Note:

1. Maxime Rodinson, Muhammad, English translation, 2nd edition, London 1996, p.x [Foreword]. Maxime Rodinson, Muhammad, English translation, 2nd edition, London 1996, p.x [Foreword].

2. The expression Masjid al-Haram rendered as the ‘Sacred mosque’ literally means the Ka‘ba, including the adjacent pavement and the place where Abraham stood for prayer, as it stands to this day and is used in the Qur’an as such (17:1) – it was originally founded by the Prophet Abraham (2:127) and is the first house of pure worship for mankind (3:96).

Muhammad Yunus, a Chemical Engineering graduate from Indian Institute of Technology, and a retired corporate executive has been engaged in an in-depth study of the Qur’an since early 90’s, focusing on its core message. He has co-authored the referred exegetic work, which received the approval of al-Azhar al-Sharif, Cairo in 2002, and following restructuring and refinement was endorsed and authenticated by Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl of UCLA, and published by Amana Publications, Maryland, USA, 2009.

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islamic-ideology/muhammad-yunus,-new-age-islam/are-all-the-mushrikin-for-all-times-“spiritually-unclean”-(rijz)-(literal-reading-of-the-verse-9-28-of-the-qur’an)?/d/14192

 




TOTAL COMMENTS:-   9


  • Dear Moderate,

    Immensely sad and deplorable as the incident is, there is bright silver lining in the concluding statement: "An earlier Gallup poll found that the majority of Americans Muslims are loyal to their country and optimistic about their future in the United States."

    Can you imagine what a terrible price a minority community would have paid as backlash of a cataclysmic terror attack (9/11) attributed to its terrorists? George Bush played a key role in preventing it by visiting one of the prominent mosques and declaring that Islam is a religion of peace. But the ripple of that volcanic eruption of terror has not died down. The war on terror and its fallout coupled with occasional eruption of terror has kept memories alive.

    Coming to the sad episode you mention, the driver must be harboring immense fear and hatred of Islam. That will indeed be corrected over time with better inter-faith relations. But if a Muslim thinks an invocation from the Qur'an reeks of militant jihad as the jihadists also pronounce it or owing its contextual meaning, you cannot really blame a semi-literate driver to take Arabic prayer as a jihadist outburst for the jihadists also pray in the same language.

    Anyway, these are the dreadful fall-outs of hatred of which countless people, including children of all minority communities suffer in many countries of the world. We as American Muslims have to diffuse Islamophobia and here is my take on this immensely grave and crucial theme:

    Confronting Islamophobia in America: Need for a Major Paradigm shift in Mosque Proceedings

    http://www.newageislam.com/muslims-and-islamophobia/confronting-islamophobia-in-america--need-for-a-major-paradigm-shift-in-mosque-proceedings/d/6602

    Feel free to criticize under appropriate thread for that is the only way you can add value to this empirical agenda. I cannot claim to be above error in outlining a strategy on such an immensely complex issue as Islamophobia.


    By muhammad yunus - 11/1/2013 6:31:17 AM



  • @ dear yunus bhai, what do u say about this news:  CAIRO – Praying to God to find his missed boarding card, a 10-year-old Muslim boy was branded a 'terrorist' and kicked-off a bus in New York after reciting short-prayer.

    “I start in the name of God, the Most Merciful, the Most Beneficent,” the Muslim child said, according to a lawsuit filed by his family against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), New York post reported.

    The Brooklyn boy was abused while boarding the B-39 bus on his way home after school in October 2012.

    Looking for his missing metro card, the boy, who was not named, recited a short prayer 'Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim', standing for “in the name of Allah, the Most Merciful, the Most Beneficent”.

    Although the boy could successfully find his metro card, the bus driver insisted on tossing him off after shouting 'terrorist'.

    “The driver said ‘Get off! And used the T-word,” Hyder Naqvi, lawyer for the boy and his family, told the Daily News, referring to the word 'terrorist'.

    "(The child) said it as he was trying to find his card so he could get home.

    “He was only 10 years old when this happened, but he was old enough to know what discrimination is, and unfortunately, now he knows what it feels like,” Naqvi added.

    When the boy arrived home, “he told his parents what happened, and they were obviously upset by it,” Naqvi was quoted by New York Post.

    Shocked by the incident, the boy shunned public transportation for months, until he decided to speak up recently.

    The boy's family complained that they couldn't get any information about the investigation results, the lawyer said.

    They cooperated with MTA during probe, after providing pictures of various drivers the boy could identify the criminal, Navi said according to New York Daily News.

    Discrimination

    Commenting on the incident, a leading Islamic advocacy group has praised the lawsuit which underlines discrimination against Muslims.

    “It’s very disappointing to see how young children have become the targets of discrimination because of their religion," Sadyia Khalique, the Director of Operations at New York chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-NY), said in a statement released on Wednesday, October 30.

    "CAIR-NY applauds the filing of the lawsuit and we hope the MTA can take disciplinary action against the employee.

    "We urge the MTA to provide diversity trainings to its employees to reflect cultural and religious competency in their attitudes, policies and services to ensure that no New Yorker becomes a victim of hate speech by MTA officials.”

    Since the 9/11 attacks on the United States, many Muslims have complained of facing discrimination and stereotypes in the society because of their Islamic attires or identities.

    An earlier Gallup poll found that the majority of Americans Muslims are loyal to their country and optimistic about their future in the United States.


    By Moderate - 11/1/2013 3:52:39 AM



  • @ dear yunus bhai, what do u say about this news:  CAIRO – Praying to God to find his missed boarding card, a 10-year-old Muslim boy was branded a 'terrorist' and kicked-off a bus in New York after reciting short-prayer.
    “I start in the name of God, the Most Merciful, the Most Beneficent,” the Muslim child said, according to a lawsuit filed by his family against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), New York post reported.
    The Brooklyn boy was abused while boarding the B-39 bus on his way home after school in October 2012.
    Looking for his missing metro card, the boy, who was not named, recited a short prayer 'Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim', standing for “in the name of Allah, the Most Merciful, the Most Beneficent”.
    Although the boy could successfully find his metro card, the bus driver insisted on tossing him off after shouting 'terrorist'.
    “The driver said ‘Get off! And used the T-word,” Hyder Naqvi, lawyer for the boy and his family, told the Daily News, referring to the word 'terrorist'.
    "(The child) said it as he was trying to find his card so he could get home.
    “He was only 10 years old when this happened, but he was old enough to know what discrimination is, and unfortunately, now he knows what it feels like,” Naqvi added.
    When the boy arrived home, “he told his parents what happened, and they were obviously upset by it,” Naqvi was quoted by New York Post.
    Shocked by the incident, the boy shunned public transportation for months, until he decided to speak up recently.
    The boy's family complained that they couldn't get any information about the investigation results, the lawyer said.
    They cooperated with MTA during probe, after providing pictures of various drivers the boy could identify the criminal, Navi said according to New York Daily News.
    Discrimination
    Commenting on the incident, a leading Islamic advocacy group has praised the lawsuit which underlines discrimination against Muslims.
    “It’s very disappointing to see how young children have become the targets of discrimination because of their religion," Sadyia Khalique, the Director of Operations at New York chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-NY), said in a statement released on Wednesday, October 30.
    "CAIR-NY applauds the filing of the lawsuit and we hope the MTA can take disciplinary action against the employee.
    "We urge the MTA to provide diversity trainings to its employees to reflect cultural and religious competency in their attitudes, policies and services to ensure that no New Yorker becomes a victim of hate speech by MTA officials.”
    Since the 9/11 attacks on the United States, many Muslims have complained of facing discrimination and stereotypes in the society because of their Islamic attires or identities.
    An earlier Gallup poll found that the majority of Americans Muslims are loyal to their country and optimistic about their future in the United States.
    By Moderate - 11/1/2013 3:52:27 AM



  • Dear Mohammed Rafiq Sahab,
    You really amused me with your concluding respectful remark: "Very respectfully yours."
    I deserve no special respect of course for I am no celebrity deserving of any special respect.
    What is really pleasing that I am playing a role of a reconcilor among at least a group of commentators whose differences I think arise largely due to the imperfection of human language and its incapability to convey the feeling of one's heart. Just this morning i wrote to hats off that he 'disappointed' me. But this disappointment was same as a person will feel for his younger brother for not winning a trophy that he expected him to win. The word can carry love as well as hatred or condemnation depending upon how one looks at it. The same is true of the expression 'grow up' - it can mean, expand you horizon of thought as well as attain maturity.
    Anyway, thank you for your comment. I hope you have verified each of my verse references. There is one error. In the last but one para 9:227 should read 9:27. I have asked the Editor to correct it. Time for me to wind up and turn in.
    By muhammad yunus - 10/29/2013 9:38:23 PM



  • Good Morning Yunus Saheb – As-Salaam Alay-Kum
    An outstanding article! You are truly a scholar and a gentleman. Of course, the right to the point pragmatic remark of Ghulam Mohiyuddin Saheb cannot be ignored either.
    I am much delighted to read Harsh’s comment. Quite frankly, in his footnote, he wrote, “Your writings please me.” This should be the real spirit of an intellectual discourse in the New Age Islam forum.
    Constructive criticism should always be encouraged and responded to with kind words.
    Let’s hope that “Mr. Rational” can gather this momentum and tone down on his usual rude remarks. “Mr. Hats Off” is an intellectual man, and I am sure that he will appreciate and endorse your viewpoint as you have expressed in your article.
    May Almighty Allah bless you and your loved ones.
    Very respectfully yours, rafiq@thelodhiacenter.org
    By Mohammed Rafiq Lodhia - 10/29/2013 8:15:56 PM



  • In this excellent article Yunus Sahab says that the clear agenda of the Quran is to bring humanity out of darkness into light. Universal brotherhood of all mankind is an important component of such an enlightenment. We must condemn any attempt to call any people unclean, untouchable or unequal. It is abhorrent to maintain that anyone has  lesser civil rights or lesser access to places of worship just because of their beliefs.
    By Ghulam Mohiyuddin - 10/29/2013 12:09:34 PM



  • Dear Harsh ji,

    Thanks for being the first to comment. As you know human mind readily draws to polemics, controversies, scandals ....so it is not surprising that a well intentioned statement or remark by a supposedly unsympathetic critic may provoke a chain of responses. Imagine what would have happened if this article was written by a non-Muslim. (???). I think you can clear the cobweb.

    Let me come to your statement: "non-Muslims are very confused about Islam, is that why Islam and its teachings are not being followed by the Muslims. Why is there a Himalayan gap between the two?"

    Since I have discussed various facets of this multifaceted issue, let me cut/past below an extract from one of my articles to avoid taxing myself and creating another controversy - given the sensitive nature of the question and possible ripple effect of the ongoing polemics that your comments generated:

    1. "Conclusion: It is high time that the Muslim Ulema abolish any division of knowledge between Islamic and un-Islamic and incorporate the study of physical sciences and other universal faculties and professional disciplines in the curriculum of the madrasas. Obviously any major transformation in educational curriculum has to come in stages, but having lost almost five centuries, there is no more time to lose. Today, the participation of Muslims in academic and professional fields, cultural arenas, and prestigious and lawful avenues of livelihood in practically all Muslim minority countries is abysmally low as their educational, professional and cultural attainments are handicapped by their own or their parents’/ancestors’ madrasa based education. In historical perspective, if any single agency has to bear the blame for the introductory poetic outburst, it is probably the Ulema and the orthodox Islam - their throwback influence and reductive madrasa curriculum as this discourse amply demonstrates – however, bitter this may sound."

    Re: 

    An Open Reminder To The Ulema: Rejecting Universal Knowledge As Un-Islamic Is Brazenly Un-Islamic And Kufr (Denial Of Truth)

    http://www.newageislam.com/islamic-sharia-laws/an-open-reminder-to-the-ulema--rejecting-universal-knowledge-as-un-islamic-is-brazenly-un-islamic-and-kufr-(denial-of-truth)/d/5961


    By muhammad yunusm - 10/29/2013 9:02:48 AM



  • Great article Mr Yunus well written and well researched. As you have mostly quoted the Quran to prove your point, it should be a welcome read. Many interpreters of the Quran end up reading secondary sources material (often contradictory) into it ending up distorting it's meanings.
    By Mubashir - 10/29/2013 7:11:56 AM



  • Well done Mr Yunus. Happy to read something good in this site after a long time. I am quite shocked to know that people like Mr Ghaus and Ms Sharma have completely misunderstood my comments and they blame me that I do not respect the prophet of Islam, which is completely an outlandish proposition. Let them think what they want to think, it is between me and, if there is God, Him. I am answerable to Him only as I know what my intention is. I only try in my comments to poke people to dig deeper and do self introspection before writing; and never get stagnant in thinking. 
    The thing that put me off the most is that when people say Islam is the religion of peace, Muhammad fought in self-defence etc. Let me not spark another controversy with this, so let me clarify for the slow heads: I know that Islam is the religion of peace, I know that Muhammad fought in self defence, I know why Muhammad married 11 times etc. Just by repeating these things wont lead Muslims anywhere, they need to contextualise these things, which you have beautifully done. 
    The basic thing that comes to a non-Muslim's mind, because non-Muslims are very confused about Islam, is that why Islam and its teachings are not being followed by the Muslims. Why is there a Himalayan gap between the two? Ms Sharma and others say there should be no gap. Well, hello, I know there should be no gap, but the main issue is how can you, Muslims (barring Ms Sharma) bridge that gap? That is the main thing. I hope this comment will remove some of the cobwebs from the minds of Ghaus and Ms Sharma about me: that I am no communal, I am no distorter of facts, I am no anti-Muslim. 
    Thank you. 
    PS: Your writings please me.

    By Harsh - 10/28/2013 11:28:15 PM



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